The absurdity of our reckless driving is called out in Gentleman Jekyll and Driver Hyde.

In the brief and unpleasant history of humans driving cars, only the insults we hurl at each other have changed.

As seen in Gentleman Jekyll and Driver Hyde, a 1950 short by the National Film Board of Canada, a polite and courteous man on foot turns—like too many of us—into a demon behind the wheel.

On the unnamed man’s drive home, phrases like “you old Betty!” and “go fry your fish!” are thrown around as he strikes fear into those who are neither as fast nor as furious as he is. All for shaving three minutes off a commute.

He’s not the only one, of course. As the concerned truck driver in the film notes, everyone would have a safety badge like his “if guys driving cars would be as polite as they are standing on their feet.”

So slow down, pinhead!

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: a wallet full of Yen bills.
    Life

    Japan’s Lost-and-Found System Is Insanely Good

    If you misplace your phone or wallet in Tokyo, chances are very good that you’ll get it back. Here’s why.

  2. photo: bicyclists in Paris during a transit strike in December.
    Transportation

    What It Would Take to Make Paris a ‘15-Minute City’

    In her re-election campaign, Mayor Anne Hidalgo says that every Paris resident should be able to meet their essential needs within a short walk or bike ride.

  3. Equity

    The Presidential Candidates that Mayors Support

    Big-city mayors favor Mike Bloomberg after his late entry into the race, while leaders in smaller cities have lined up behind Pete Buttigieg.

  4. photo: Masdar City in Abu Dhabi
    Environment

    What Abu Dhabi’s City of the Future Looks Like Now

    At the UN’s World Urban Forum in Abu Dhabi, attendees toured Masdar City, the master-planned eco-complex designed to show off the UAE’s commitment to sustainability.

  5. Equity

    What Mike Bloomberg Got Wrong About Redlining and the Financial Crisis

    Comments about New Deal-era housing discrimination made by presidential candidate Michael Bloomberg echo a familiar narrative about minority homeowners.

×