TFW your mayor is eaten alive by rats on the subway he built.

Oh, are you disappointed in your city’s recent rapid-transit expansion? Is the platform signage not up to your standards? Ticketing system so 20th century? Well at least it isn’t overrun by GIANT RATS.

This nightmare scenario comes from the 1982 Canadian horror film Deadly Eyes, in which a super-breed of rats raised on steroid-laced grain menace Toronto’s underground infrastructure. No tunnel is unreachable for these rodents (played by dachshunds in rat costumes), including the mayor’s prized new subway line.

A power outage and rat attack interferes with the inaugural ride until Paul, a middle-aged divorcé, kills off most of the rats with fire before taking control of the train. As he pulls into the new station, well-dressed guests snacking on hors d’oeuvres are greeted by a blood-strewn subway car and a few surviving rats inside it feasting on Hizzoner.

James Herbert, who wrote the book Deadly Eyes is based off of, disowned the film.

H/T BlogTO, Retrontario

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