Too lazy to fly?

Pigeons commuting on BART

Sometimes riding the San Francisco Bay Area’s public transit can be like entering a zoo, what with the pet rats, snakes, parrots, and iguanas… so, so many iguanas.

But lately some animals showed up unaccompanied by human escorts—two pigeons, perched on a BART seat as if calmly awaiting their stop. Redditor axearm posted this photo of their commute, taken on Tuesday by Berkeley resident Angela Pearson. “I was getting on the Pittsburg/Bay Point train and thought I hit the jackpot as I could see a bunch of empty seats,” Pearson emails. “But once I got on the train it was very apparent that the pigeons had those seats reserved!”

It’s unknown how the birds boarded the train; pigeons are common in some BART stations, perched like plump gargoyles on high ledges while pooping on the platform. They wouldn’t be the first to travel by train, as evident in this footage of another pigeon in Toronto:

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