The signage at Bathurst station is getting the Honest Ed’s treatment for the rest of 2016.

Honest Ed’s, Toronto’s most revered discount store (founded by the local legend Ed Mirvish), will close on December 31 after nearly 70 years of business. As a tribute, the nearest subway station is giving itself the Honest Ed’s design treatment.

For the rest of 2016, Bathurst station will be covered in signage that pays tribute to the hand-painted prices and puns synonymous with the store’s image. With a TTC-themed twist, riders will come across slogans including  “TTC is the best value, Landsdowne,” “Give us a Finch, and we’ll take you a mile,” and “Been there, Dundas.” They’ll also have to navigate their way around the station with Honest Ed’s-style directional signs—a radical departure from the austere sans-serif ones seen throughout the TTC.

While charming, it’s rather strange to see a public entity pay such a thorough tribute to a private business. The gesture, however, seems to have hit a soft spot for nostalgic Torontonians who have seen the city change dramatically after decades of growth and new wealth. Brad Ross, the TTC’s Executive Director of Corporate Communications, received a deluge of responses on Twitter asking to make the transformation permanent after he shared photos of the Bathurst makeover earlier this week. Ross says there will eventually be a permanent tribute to the store inside the station.

The site where Honest Ed’s now stands is slated to become part of a mixed-use development known as “Mirvish Village” in the coming years.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Perspective

    In a Pandemic, We're All 'Transit Dependent'

    Now more than ever, public transportation is not just about ridership. Buses, trains, and subways make urban civilization possible.

  2. Coronavirus

    The Post-Pandemic Urban Future Is Already Here

    The coronavirus crisis stands to dramatically reshape cities around the world. But the biggest revolutions in urban space may have begun before the pandemic.

  3. Equity

    What Bigotry Looks Like During Social Distancing

    As reports of harassment and assault against Asian Americans increase, community advocates are finding new ways to tackle the spread of xenophobia.

  4. photo: San Francisco Municipal Transit Agency employees turn an empty cable car in San Francisco on March 4.
    Transportation

    As Coronavirus Quiets Streets, Some Cities Speed Road and Transit Fixes

    With cities in lockdown and workplaces closed, the big drop in traffic and transit riders allows road repair and construction projects to rush forward.

  5. A pedestrian wearing a protective face mask walks past a boarded up building in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Tuesday, March 24, 2020. Governors from coast to coast Friday told Americans not to leave home except for dire circumstances and ordered nonessential business to shut their doors.
    Equity

    The Geography of Coronavirus

    What do we know so far about the types of places that are more susceptible to the spread of Covid-19? In the U.S., density is just the beginning of the story.

×