The city logged more than 200 complaints in the first week after adding a bike-lane feature to its 311 app and website.

Peter Burka/Flickr

It’s barely been a week since New York started allowing people to go online and report vehicles blocking bike lanes, and the city has already logged more than 200 of these annoying and dangerous violations.

As predicted on CityLab, there now exists a map of illegal parking in bike lanes. Based on tips to New York’s 311 app and website, the city-produced map shows alleged lane violations occurring mostly in Manhattan and Brooklyn with a decent smattering in Queens. Red dots indicate situations where the police “responded to the complaint and took action to fix the condition,” according to NYC Open Data. Blue ones denote where police decided “action was not necessary,” where the offending vehicle had skedaddled before cops arrived, and complaints with insufficient info from tipsters.

NYC Open Data

A few hot spots stand out: There’s a stretch of First Avenue in Manhattan from 14th to 35th streets where the lanes seem as clogged as a lifelong Mickey D eater’s heart. Vernon Boulevard along the East River in Queens has seen many complaints. In Brooklyn, barricaded lanes cluster on Dekalb and Lafayette avenues, in the midsection of Park Slope, and just all over the downtown area. The number of times police took action against lane blockers? At last count, that’d be 23 instances out of 202 complaints.

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