Except as something really fast and elegant.

A full 24 hours on the New York City subway will crush your spirit and assault every last one of your senses. Here’s what that looks like if you view it from afar, abstract everything, speed it up about 400 times, and put some calming music on in the background:

Will Geary, a Columbia University student, put the visualization together using station location data from the MTA and timetables for each subway line. The orderly nature of train movement masks the madness inside each station and subway car in a project like this. But if you’re into that, check out his Citi Bike activity map, where the dots representing each user really let you feel the commuting chaos wash over Manhattan.

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