Casey Fiesler/Flickr

“Wait” is possibly the catchiest song ever performed by a talking pedestrian traffic signal.

If traffic engineers ran the music industry, the most legendary track to drop this year might be this fly remix of a crosswalk signal’s walking instructions.

Michael Nguyen, a computer-science major at the University of Georgia, created “Wait” on the recommendation of fellow student Ashley Hegwood. Both had been intrigued by the monotonous-yet-catchy voice of a crosswalk indicator outside their school’s cafeteria, and thought it’d be fun to put it to music. Score one for musical creativity: The track is both hilarious and earworm-y. You could easily imagine it blasting at a beach party while hotties spray warm champagne into the ether. (Nguyen hasn’t responded to a request for comment, presumably because he’s out making other remixes of random campus sounds, as per this report in The Red & Black.)

“Wait” now joins the small but hallowed pantheon of pedestrian-themed songs, including Nancy Sinatra's “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’,” the Proclaimers’ “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles),” and of course the Ventures’ surf classic “Walk Don’t Run.”

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of yellow vest protesters in Paris, France.
    Equity

    To Understand American Political Anger, Look to ‘Peripheral France’

    French geographer Christophe Guilluy has a controversial diagnosis of working-class resentment in the age of Trump, Brexit, and the Yellow Vests.

  2. Design

    How 'Maintainers,' Not 'Innovators,' Make the World Turn

    We need more stories about the labor that sustains society, a group of scholars say.

  3. A man walks by an abandoned home in Youngstown, Ohio
    Life

    How Some Shrinking Cities Are Still Prospering

    A study finds that some shrinking cities are prosperous areas with smaller, more-educated populations. But they also have greater levels of income inequality.

  4. A rendering of a co-living building in San Jose.
    Life

    The Largest Co-Living Building in the World Is Coming to San Jose

    The startup Starcity plans to build an 800-unit, 18-story “dorm for adults” to help affordably house Silicon Valley’s booming workforce.

  5. A cat lays flat on a bench at a park on the outskirts of Tokyo.
    Life

    Why Don't Americans Use Their Parks At Night?

    Most cities aren’t fond of letting people use parks after dark. But there are good lifestyle, environmental, and safety reasons to reconsider.

×