Casey Fiesler/Flickr

“Wait” is possibly the catchiest song ever performed by a talking pedestrian traffic signal.

If traffic engineers ran the music industry, the most legendary track to drop this year might be this fly remix of a crosswalk signal’s walking instructions.

Michael Nguyen, a computer-science major at the University of Georgia, created “Wait” on the recommendation of fellow student Ashley Hegwood. Both had been intrigued by the monotonous-yet-catchy voice of a crosswalk indicator outside their school’s cafeteria, and thought it’d be fun to put it to music. Score one for musical creativity: The track is both hilarious and earworm-y. You could easily imagine it blasting at a beach party while hotties spray warm champagne into the ether. (Nguyen hasn’t responded to a request for comment, presumably because he’s out making other remixes of random campus sounds, as per this report in The Red & Black.)

“Wait” now joins the small but hallowed pantheon of pedestrian-themed songs, including Nancy Sinatra's “These Boots Are Made for Walkin’,” the Proclaimers’ “I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles),” and of course the Ventures’ surf classic “Walk Don’t Run.”

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