A cyclist in San Francisco
Robert Galbraith/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Life-saving commutes: Cycling to work can nearly halve the risk of cancer and heart disease, according to a five-year U.K. study, which also found benefits from walking commutes of more than six miles per week. (BBC News)

California breathin’: California crowds the list of the American Lung Association’s ranking of worst-polluted U.S. cities, with Los Angeles retaining its place at the top of the heap. This year’s report includes a not-subtle reference to Trump’s March rollback of clean air requirements. (Route Fifty)

Times Square transformation: Celebrating the completion of a six-year makeover, New York City’s famously congested square has emerged as a pedestrian-friendly, European-style piazza. (Wired)

Chain ban: Various cities have tried to salvage small business and neighborhood character by limiting chain stores, but has any really mastered the formula? (The Guardian)

Centennial icon: As I.M. Pei, “the aristocrat of American architects,” turns 100 on April 26, New York Magazine looks at his legacy of iconic museums and Brutalist landmarks, along with some of his visions that never got off the ground.

Sin City rail: A new bill would allow Las Vegas officials to pursue funding for a proposed light rail between the airport and casino strip. (Las Vegas Sun)

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