The Toronto Transit Commission and the National Ballet of Canada have the antidote to the depressing “If You See Something, Say Something.”

The Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) has a new fleet of subway and streetcars, so why not show them off in style?

In its latest ad campaign launched late last year, called We Move You, dancers from the National Ballet of Canada run, twirl, and twist their way through empty stations and rail cars with an elegance few riders can match.

The idea came about after the National Ballet contacted the TTC last spring to team up on a campaign.* “We wanted to reach existing customers to think about the TTC in a different way,” says TTC head of customer communications, Cheryn Thoun. As a result, We Move You turned into a print and online campaign, with streetcar wraps, posters inside stations and railcars, and videos on YouTube.

“We also wanted leisure users or those who maybe haven't used the TTC in a while to consider us for going out to attend all the amazing entertainment and arts events in this city,” Thoun says. The National Ballet, meanwhile, wanted “a new audience to see this art form as truly accessible, beautiful, and highlight the amazing athleticism and artistry of their dancers.”

Recently, We Move You won in two categories (“public sector” and “multi channel communications”) for this year’s North American Excellence Awards in PR and Communication. Thrilled with the results of the campaign, Thoun says We Move You “helped to shine a light on the ‘new TTC’ and how powerful these collaborations can be.”

The TTC has been able to do more ambitious advertising than most North American systems over the years, but We Move You is about as highbrow as any campaign can get.

*Correction: This article has been updated to clarify the origin of the collaboration between the TTC and the National Ballet for the campaign.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a full parking lot with a double rainbow over it
    Transportation

    Parking Reform Will Save the City

    Cities that require builders to provide off-street parking trigger more traffic, sprawl, and housing unaffordability. But we can break the vicious cycle.   

  2. a map comparing the sizes of several cities
    Maps

    The Commuting Principle That Shaped Urban History

    From ancient Rome to modern Atlanta, the shape of cities has been defined by the technologies that allow commuters to get to work in about 30 minutes.

  3. A woman looks straight at camera with others people and trees in background.
    Equity

    Why Pittsburgh Is the Worst City for Black Women, in 6 Charts

    Pittsburgh is the worst place for black women to live in for just about every indicator of livability, says the city’s Gender Equity Commission.

  4. a photo of a man at a bus stop in Miami
    Transportation

    Very Bad Bus Signs and How to Make Them Better

    Clear wayfinding displays can help bus riders feel more confident, and give a whole city’s public transportation system an air of greater authority.

  5. Tents with the Honolulu skyline behind them
    Life

    Where Is the Best City to Live, Based on Salaries and Cost of Living?

    Paychecks stretch the furthest in smaller cities for most workers, but techies continue to do best in larger, more expensive cities.

×