Uber CEO Travis Kalanick Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Uber probe: The Department of Justice has launched a criminal investigation into Uber’s use of secret software that helped its drivers evade local transportation regulators. Reuters reports:

Uber has acknowledged the software, known as "Greyball," helped it identify and circumvent government officials who were trying to clamp down on Uber in areas where its service had not yet been approved, such as Portland, Oregon.

From protests to policy: Why aren’t we seeing more Black Lives Matter protests amid recent police controversies? The Chicago Tribune finds a more subdued movement shifting its focus toward policy, both against Trump’s agenda and on local issues like bail policy.

Google city: Sidewalk Labs, Google’s urban innovation arm, is approaching cities with plans to build its own unique metropolis—a “large-scale district” to serve as a national model for smart city tech. (State Scoop)

Voters on the periphery: Le Pen, Trump, Brexit—Slate wonders how we should label this international ascendancy of non-metropolitan voters fighting the status quo. As the French election approaches Sunday, the buzzword in Paris now is “la France périphérique,” or “peripheral France.”

Identity rights: Union City, New Jersey, is now one of several U.S. cities where a municipal ID can provide undocumented immigrants with access to rights and services, with 3,000 cards issued in the program’s first two weeks. (NJ.com)

Walking for Jane: This weekend, over 200 cities around the world (including Miami and Vancouver) will host “Jane’s Walk” community events celebrating famed urbanist Jane Jacobs’ legacy of pedestrian-oriented city planning. (Miami New Times, Vancouver Courier)

City sketch savant: After just a brief gaze of a city’s panorama, British artist Stephen Wiltshire can draw it from memory in breathtaking detail. (The Guardian)

The urban lens:

Looking up! Harris Scarfe building, #moonah. Life in the #suburbs is #green. #citylabontheground #hobart #brick

A post shared by Olivia Bowman (@livbgood) on

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