Passengers on a full subway train are pictured.
Room for one more? Brendan McDermid/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

TODAY: CityLab is joining with media outlets around the U.S. to bring awareness to homelessness in America. Read more about it here.

All aboard: To understand New York City's plague of subway delays, look not to its aging infrastructure, but instead to its swelling ridership—nearly 6 million riders per day cramming into a system that's remained the same size for decades. The New York Times reports:

Starting in 2011, the growth in ridership became steeper, and in 2013, it reached a tipping point with the system no longer able to easily absorb the extra riders. “In early 2014 and 2015, it was more than saturated, and there was this cumulative effect against on-time performance, ” said Wynton Habersham, head of the subways department at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Running trains on time—once the reliable norm—has dropped across the system, and only a handful of lines now have on-time rates above 70 percent.

Police charges: Three Chicago police officers were indicted Tuesday on charges of conspiring to cover up the 2014 shooting death of Laquan McDonald, after the viral video of the incident set off massive protests and left the city scrambling to reform its police department. (AP)

Building the wall: A border protection official says construction of President Trump’s proposed wall along the Mexican border could begin with prototypes in San Diego this summer, as a first step to the controversial 2,000-mile project. (L.A. Times)

See also: Across the country, health clinics serving immigrant populations are reporting a downturn in appointments following Trump’s deportation orders. (New York Times)

Happy Birthday, Canada: As Canada turns 150 and thousands prepare to descend on Ottawa for July 1 celebrations, The Guardian spotlights the city as a fitting capital for the nation: ”humble, unassuming, getting the job done in the shadow of more grandiose neighbours.”

The grocery gap: D.C.’s recent population swell has ushered in a proliferation of new grocery stores—but only for wealthy neighborhoods, while the poorest wards have a choice of only three supermarkets serving 160,000 residents. (The Washington Post)

Dallas’s transit future: After a big decision last week halting a loan for a new DART rail line, D Mag calls for re-framing Dallas’ conversation on regional mobility to ditch the old “city vs. suburbs” refrain—starting with today’s appointment of a new transit board.

The urban lens:

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