Cyclists use New York City's CitiBike service.
Rickey Rogers/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Cycling shift: Not so long ago, only hardened cyclists were brave enough to take to the streets in New York City. But today the Big Apple sees more bike commuters than any U.S. city, as infrastructure has expanded with new routes and 10,000 Citi Bikes. The New York Times reports on the cultural shift:

Citi Bike alone accounted for a record 70,286 trips last Wednesday, which the program called “the highest single-day ridership of any system in the Western world outside of Paris.” The bike-sharing system in New York has signed up 130,000 riders for annual memberships, up from nearly 100,000 last year.

Still, the surging bike culture has intensified a “bikelash” among some community leaders and residents, who say boorish cyclists speed and run red lights, text while riding, cross onto sidewalks and go the wrong way on streets. Bike lanes and Citi Bike docking stations, critics say, take away space for parking and deliveries and hinder traffic on already-clogged streets.

  • See also: In the U.K., where a new policy aims to ban all gas and diesel vehicles by 2040, The Guardian argues instead for shifting more attention to cycling, saying “there is no clearer and bigger opportunity to help reduce air pollution.”

Texting ban: Honolulu has become the first major U.S. city to target “distracted walking” by law, with a new ban against texting in crosswalks to take effect in October. Slate warns this will “inject police discretion into another routine of daily life” while perpetuating a culture of “pedestrian blaming.”

Blue backlash: Police chiefs across the country are distancing themselves from President Trump’s statements Friday encouraging “roughing up” arrestees, while Trump’s comments on paddy wagons and head injuries particularly hit home in Baltimore in their resonance to the 2015 death of Freddie Gray. (Washington Post, CNN)

The Silver Line’s mixed success: In the three years since its opening, the D.C. Metro’s new Silver Line has helped fuel an unprecedented building boom in Tysons Corner, but ridership numbers have failed to meet expectations. Meanwhile, as construction continues on the massive infrastructure project, other Virginia communities are prepping for the impact. (The Washington Post)

Opioid fix: Chicago is pioneering a new strategy of giving at-risk inmates the overdose-reversing drug naloxone upon their release from jail, as other cities experiment with similar approaches of “naloxone kits” for fighting the opioid epidemic. (AP)

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