Passengers wait inside a stopped C subway train in New York City after a power failure during the morning commute in April. Brendan McDermid/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Saving the subway: An $800 million emergency plan to turn around New York City’s distressed subway involves seat-free cars on crowded routes, extra trains on the C line, and more countdown clocks, among 30 measures the Metropolitan Transportation Authority laid out Tuesday. But questions remain over how much the city itself will fund, The New York Times reports:

The subway rescue plan came amid a bitter feud that has broken into the public arena between Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, who controls the authority and urged the city to help him fix the subway, and Mr. de Blasio. The mayor has resisted pouring more money into the subway, since the state runs the system.

At a hastily called news conference at a City Hall subway station on Tuesday evening, Mr. de Blasio called Mr. Lhota’s plan an “important first step,” but refused to commit new city money to support it.

What works for affordable housing: A roundup from Curbed highlights six pioneering solutions from local governments, including a rent-to-ownership model for artists in Cleveland, a Denver pilot to convert vacant high-end apartments into affordable units, and a Philadelphia housing project that integrates health services.

Begging bans no more: A 2015 Supreme Court decision on churches’ free speech has created unexpected consequences for panhandling enforcement in cities across the country, with courts now striking down numerous local bans on public begging. (Governing)

Data-mapping redlining: Louisville, Kentucky, is winning praise for a map that visualizes the modern day effects of redlining, which combines historic national archives data with current data about poverty levels and racial demographics. (Gov Tech)

Chalupa stop: A new partnership between Lyft and Taco Bell—now in pilot mode in Newport Beach, California—allows passengers to request drive-through stops at the fast food chain between 9 p.m. and 2 a.m. (New York Times)

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