A Hyperloop test tube is pictured.
Michael Kooren/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Take your time: Elon Musk’s Hyperloop remains a “wild hypothetical,” but let’s imagine for a second that it could deliver on the promise of New York-to-D.C. travel in 29 minutes. If the long-held standard that people live, on average, a 30-minute commute away from where they work, it could have dramatic implications for urban migration. The New York Times runs through the thought experiment:

People priced out of Brooklyn could move to Baltimore. Congressional aides would commute to Philadelphia. Whole cities—and labor and housing markets—would fuse together.

… When you give people greater speed, they don’t use it to save time; they use it to consume more space. As a result, cities have spread outward as transportation technology has evolved. Horse-drawn carriages enlarged pedestrian towns. Streetcars enabled streetcar suburbs. Highways made exurbia possible.

Who speaks on metro?: Citing First Amendment concerns, the ACLU is suing D.C.’s Metro authority based on restrictions against four ads that run the gamut of the political spectrum: promoting an abortion bill, a PETA campaign for veganism, a new book from right-wing provocateur Milo Yiannopoulos—and ironically, an ad from the ACLU itself with transcripts of the First Amendment. (The New York Times)

Teen pregnancy concerns: Twenty big-city health officials have denounced the Trump administration’s cuts to $214 million for teen pregnancy programs across the country—including Baltimore’s Leanna Wen, who fears what the $3.5 million loss in her city will mean for already high teen pregnancy rates. (Washington Post)

Tourist snapshot: A new data mapping project visualizes Airbnb ratings in 28 cities worldwide, revealing the types of impressions and priorities tourists can form in new cities within mere days. (Inverse)

  • In other map nerd news: New York City cartographers are on the verge of completing the world’s most complex underground map, tracking the pipes, tunnels and tracks that are critical for both disaster relief and day-to-day functions. (Bloomberg)

Underground arts: In D.C., the galleries and performances taking root in an abandoned trolley station beneath Dupont Circle are fostering a more experimental arts movement in the traditionally “staid bureaucratic” city. (New York Times)

The urban lens:

I love the light at this time of day, at this time if year. 4pm, 8 August, Macquarie Street, #hobart.

A post shared by Olivia Bowman (@livbgood) on

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