Self-driving cars are pictured.
Aaron Josefczyk/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

The road ahead: With the rise of self-driving cars, one glaring problem for cities will be the loss of revenue from parking fees, traffic fines, and other money that comes from human drivers—which often accounts for a big portion of city budgets. GovTech presents the example of Austin:

Austin’s transportation director, Robert Spillar, is working to prepare the city. But earlier this year, a realization hit him about what driverless cars might mean for his budget. “It struck me,” he says. “Half my revenue for transportation capacity and operations improvements is based on a parking model that may be obsolete in a dozen years.”

  • GovTech references a special report from Governing that breaks down potential losses in the 25 U.S. largest cities, which together raised $5 billion last year from car-related fees.

Seattle primary: The city is poised to elect a female mayor for the first time in 91 years, as four women lead in votes in a crowded primary that, as of this morning, positions former U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan to win. Durkan, an Obama appointee and the country’s first openly gay U.S. attorney, would replace Mayor Ed Murray after he dropped out of the race amid allegations of sexual abuse. (Seattle Times)

Shooting aftermath: Minneapolis has become “a city divided” in the tense two weeks following the police shooting of Justine Damond, The Washington Post writes, while the atypical case of a white victim here is driving more attention to the cause of police reform.

Redlining –> gentrification: A new mapping tool from the National Community Reinvestment Coalition illuminates the history of redlining in U.S. city neighborhoods. As Next City shows in five examples: “Pick almost any hot neighborhood today—and you are likely to find a formerly redlined area that is now being transformed.”

Dan Savage on cities: The Urbanist hears opinions from the famous sex columnist and activist on the benefits of city living—including, Savage says, more options for food and sex, and a tolerant space for queer communities.

The urban lens:

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