An artist transformed this revolving billboard in Berlin into something that's fun for kids.

You've got to envy the job of French artist Florian Riviere: He goes around all day thinking of how to make the municipal landscape more fun.

Last this site checked in with him, he was rolling out carpets painted to resemble crosswalks, a pedestrian-safety product that you could carry around town on your shoulder. Now he's turned his playful eye to grocery stores, or rather, an advertising column outside a store in Berlin that slowly revolves.

By hooking up a few shopping carts to the rotating pillar, Riviere created a carousel that kids can ride in. And they seem to enjoy it, too, although the merry-go-round moves at a slug's pace. (Perhaps that's something safety-obsessed parents can enjoy.) The artist fashioned this carnival piece in April; no doubt officials have disassembled it by now.

Head on over to Riviere's website to see what else he's been up to lately: The sidewalk dominoes are pretty cool, as is the hacked barbell.

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