The second installment in a five-part series featuring Richard Florida leading a conversation on the future of the Motor City.

Detroit Rising bug
A determined city looks to the future See full coverage

"I think what Detroit offers is for young people or interesting people or engaged people — artists, innovators, musicians, designers, city-builders, place-makers — it offers something for them, and it doesn't have to advertise." -- Richard Florida

Last month, Cities readers sent in their questions and ideas on the current state of Detroit and where it's heading. Over the next several weeks, Atlantic Senior Editor Richard Florida responds by leading a conversation on the future of the Motor City. This is the second installment. Watch the first episode here.

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