Google

 "Smarty Pins” uses miles as a scoring system—run out and you’re done.

We’ve played quite a few great Google Maps-based games in the last year. And now, Google itself has unveiled Smarty Pins, a new geography trivia game that’s just as addictive as the rest.

In Smarty Pins, you start with a total of 1,000 miles in the bank. Each trivia question will ask you pin down a specific location on a map; the number of miles you’re off by gets subtracted from your total. You can get up to 15 bonus miles if you answer within 15 seconds, after which a hint will pop up to push you along. The goal, of course, is to answer as many questions as possible before your miles run out. You can play a default game with all sorts of questions or focus on a specific category, such as Entertainment, Science & Geography, or one of the Featured Topics (which currently includes World Cup Trivia).

For each question, Google puts you in the general vicinity of the correct answer, but it’s up to you to zoom in, get precise, and protect your miles.

 

All images via Google. 

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